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From: MOEKOTT@aol.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 14:35:01 EST
To: balloon@fooledya.com
Subject: What did T invent?

Hi Guys,

At the risk of sounding like an ego maniac, let me explain what I think are
and are not my original ideas and what came before and what came after.

Certainly I did not invent the piston and cylinder.  They have been around for
who knows how long in a huge variety of configurations.  A common tire pump
uses a vertical cylinder.

Before I made the first High Volume, Low Pressure, Self Standing, Vertical
Piston, Manual air pump, made to fully inflate a 260, such a thing did not
exist.  At least, not in my experience.  In thinking about what I needed to do
the job, I went through all the materials and compression devices I could
think of.  There was no configuration of these things to do the job already
existing in the world.  (Well, I later found out someone had manufactured a
bellows with a riser pipe for twisty balloons but my pump works very
differently.  I'd love to see one of those old pumps if anyone knows of one.)

Not enough people needed a manual pump for a 260's worth or air at a fairly
low pressure to justify engineering and manufacturing such a thing in the
regular business world.

I was also not aware of anyone using PVC pipe as a cylinder for an air pump.
The inner wall of plumbing pipe is too variable for an engineer to seriously
consider making it seal air in a manufactured air pump.  As far as I know PVC
plumbing pipe had not been used for this purpose before.

I used PVC because it was available and inexpensive for a large pipe.  I set
up the vertical cylinder so that your body weight would create the main force,
not your muscles like a large hand pump.  The vertical cylinder also placed
the nozzle and the push point at a convenient location.

In 1985 I made the first one on a picnic table outside of Seattle.  For the
next 8 years I spent what seemed like 1/2 the time on the road building a
market for the pump.  I did hundreds of lectures and workshops teaching people
how to have a good time and make money twisting balloons.  What this pump did
for twisting was make it possible for anyone to inflate mass quantities of
balloons.  Twisting was no longer limited to people who could inflate a 260 by
mouth.  I think the pump, my workshops and the free catalog have had a large
part in growing the number of twisters.

As I made and sold more and more pumps I started seeing variations on the
theme of the self standing vertical cylinder manual PVC pumps.  The more
different their guts are the less I feel that they are directly copying but I
would suggest the base idea of all these manual, high volume, low pressure,
vertical cylinder, PVC pumps for 260's comes from my original pump back in
1985.

Now I'm not saying that someone else could not have come up with this
independently.  But for them to claim independence in their invention they
would have to assert they were not aware there was a manual, self standing,
high volume, low pressure, vertical cylinder, PVC pump for 260's.  This is an
assertion that I do make because there was not one before I came up with it.

I don't claim control of this idea.  I request respect.  Certainly, the worst
offense, in my mind, would be drawing plans of Pump 1 and publishing them.

This is how I see it.  If you have a different take, I'm happy to listen.

T (free hard copy catalog, just ask) Myers - TMyersMagi@aol.com
online catalog - http://www.tmyers.com - click to go to
<A HREF="http://152.175.122.246/">;T. Myers Magic, Inc.</A>
USA/Canada 1-800-648-6221 or (512) 288-7925 Fax (512) 288-7694


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